APC may cease to exist after Buhari –Shehu Sani

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Shehu Sani

The All Progressives Congress, APC, may cease to exist after the exit of President Muhammadu Buhari, Senator Shehu Sani representing Kaduna Central at the National Assembly has said.

He said that was because Buhari was the mainstay of the party.

“Buhari remains the heart, soul and the oxygen of the party. I don’t think after Buhari there can be APC again,” he said.

It would be recalled that Sani left the APC recently to the Peoples Redemption Party, PRP, following the irreconcilable differences between him and Governor Nasir-El-Rufai of Kaduna State.

Sani who spoke during an interview on Channels Television programme, Sunday Politics, said it was unfortunate that a party that promised change could not carry out the necessary change within it.

Said he:  “It is unfortunate that a party that has promised to change this country cannot even deliver change to itself.”

The senator spoke about how he was persuaded to stay back when some legislators moved from the APC.

According to him, he was persuaded to stay back by Buhari and the party’s national leader, Asiwaju Bola Tinubu.

He denied ever asking for automatic ticket for the Senatorial seat, saying that Governor Nasir El-Rufai used his overwhelming influence on Buhari and the National Chairman of the APC, Adams Oshiomhole to hold on to the senatorial ticket through his aide.

His words.  “There was no time I demanded that I should be given automatic ticket. Last July, there was an uprising in the national party whereby legislators decided to decamp and I was part of the team but I was held back through the intervention of Bola Tinubu and President Buhari.

“They gave me the assurance that the issues prompting me to leave the party will be addressed.

“There were discussions and promises whereby those of us who have raised issues of problems with governors of our state will be addressed.

“For you to emerge as a candidate in the APC, first of all, you have to have somebody close to the seat of power, secondly if you are in the favoured book of the governor.”